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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

A study finds that ants on board the International Space Station still use teamwork to search new areas, despite falling off the walls of their containers for up to eight seconds.
Fossils from the ocean floor are yielding clues to the Indian monsoon millions of years ago.
Solar Impulse, the fuel-free aeroplane, lands in Chongqing, China, to complete leg five of its attempt to fly around the world.
The mystery of Mercury's dark surface can be explained by a steady dusting of carbon from passing comets, research suggests.
Porpoises finely adjust the size of the beams of sound they use to hunt - using sound like a searchlight to trap their prey, a study finds.
US astronaut Scott Kelly and Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko arrive for a 12-month tour of duty on the International Space Station.
A light bulb made with graphene - said by its UK developers to be the first commercially viable consumer product using the super-strong carbon - is to go on sale later this year.
A pledge by the Greens to double science funding contrasts with the statements offered by five other party leaders, answering a call to set out their policies on science.
Eighteen years of satellite data reveal an acceleration in the thinning of many of Antarctica's floating ice shelves.
A long-running study shows dark matter coasts unscathed through galactic collisions, betraying a ghostly lack of interaction with the known Universe.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Neuroscientists are taking inspiration from natural motor control to design new prosthetic devices that can better replace limb function. Researchers have tested a range of brain-controlled devices -- from wheelchairs to robots to advanced limbs -- that work with their users to intelligently perform tasks.
Scientists have found the genetic signature of enterovirus D68 in half of the California and Colorado children diagnosed with acute flaccid myelitis -- sudden, unexplained muscle weakness and paralysis -- between 2012 and 2014, with most cases occurring during a nationwide outbreak of severe respiratory illness from EV-D68 last fall.
The first study to investigate the relationship between eating fruit and vegetables containing pesticide residues and the quality of men's semen has shown a link with lower sperm counts and percentages of normally-formed sperm.
Date syrup – a thick, sweet liquid derived from dates that is widely consumed across the Middle East – shows antibacterial activity against a number of disease-causing bacteria, including Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli.
For many, body odor is an unfortunate side effect of their daily lives. The smell is caused by bacteria on the skin breaking down naturally secreted molecules contained within sweat. Now scientists have studied the underarm microbiome and identified a unique set of enzymes in the bacterium Staphylococcus hominis that is effective at breaking down sweat molecules into compounds known as thioalcohols, an important component of the characteristic body odor smell.
 

Biology News Net

Coast redwoods are famous for being the tallest trees in the world, but their height is not the only thing that sets them apart. Unlike most conifer trees, coast redwoods can reproduce by sprouting from cut stumps, fallen logs, and roots. Researchers from the University of California, Berkeley, are uncovering important information about patterns of coast redwood clones with a new DNA analysis method that could help forest management and preservation efforts.


Study co-author Gonedele Sere, on left, holds a cocoa plant found at an illegal farm in the Dassioko Forest Reserve in Ivory Coast.
Researchers surveying for endangered primates in national parks and forest reserves of Ivory Coast found, to their surprise, that most of these protected areas had been turned into illegal cocoa farms, a new study reports.

Researchers have been fascinated for a long time by learning and memory formation, and many questions are still open. Bochum-based neuroscientists Prof Dr Denise Manahan-Vaughan and Dr Hardy Hagena have discovered a key building block for this complex process. A particular neurotransmitter receptor, namely the metabotropic glutamate receptor 5, is a switch for activating opposing forms of plasticity in the hippocampus, a brain region vital for memory forming. They reported in the current edition of "The Journal of Neuroscience".


The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston's Scott Weaver, globally recognized for his expertise in mosquito-borne diseases, has been studying chikungunya for more than 15 years.
The mosquito-borne chikungunya virus has been the subject of increasing attention as it spreads throughout South America, Central America, the Caribbean and Mexico. This painful and potentially debilitating disease is predicted to soon spread to the U.S.

Scientists have revealed a brand new function for one of the first cancer genes ever discovered - the retinoblastoma gene - in a finding that could open up exciting new approaches to treatment.

 

New Scientist - Online news

Every tumour is unique – could armies of cancer-infested mice avatars help find the best drugs for each individual? (full text available to subscribers)







The world's largest study of brain structure and socioeconomic status shows parental wealth affects the size of a child's brain - and their intelligence







Later this year, all babies in the UK will begin receiving jabs against the country's most common form of meningitis







From spyware designed to catch students misbehaving to police tracking rioters by phone, we are spied on as never before, reveals a book by Bruce Schneier







Why do English speakers struggle to identify even common smells like cinnamon, asks linguist Asifa Majid. Is it down to language itself, or our environment?







Hungarian-born Bauhaus artist Gyorgy Kepes placed leaves and other objects on top of photo-sensitive paper to create striking, monochrome "photograms"
A potion made from a medieval medical recipe killed MRSA bacteria in the lab, raising hopes it could lead to new treatments for modern-day skin infections
War isn't just for the history books. Bombs, munitions testing and chemical weapons dumps have left an indelible legacy on geology (full text available to subscribers)
All eyes are on the space drama unfolding in the asteroid belt. It matters not a jot whether Ceres is a planet or a dwarf







An exhibition at London's Science Museum and a philosophising book explore our desire for food, while another new book exposes the food industry's dark secrets







 
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