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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

The UN’s new climate chief says she is confident, despite concerns about President Trump's policies.
The simple up-and-down motion of hand pumps could help scientists secure a key water source for 200 million people in Africa.
The government is to enshrine into law the idea that there should be no political interference in research funding.
A new report says that using wood pellets to generate low-carbon electricity is a highly flawed policy.
Astronomers have discovered seven Earth-sized planets orbiting a single star - a record number.
A third runway at Heathrow can only be justified if it does not breach climate change laws, MPs say.
New video is released of the Antarctic ice crack that promises to produce a giant berg.
Particles of debris from car tyres are ending up in the ocean as "plastic soup", a conservationist group warns.
Seven new species of night frog have been discovered in India, including four miniature forms.
Up to 16% of hydraulically fractured oil and gas wells spill liquids each year, according to new data.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Sometimes cells spit out things we don't want them to -- like medications. Researchers have determined the three-dimensional structure of a tiny pump that expels, among other things, chemotherapy agents. This new knowledge could lead to the design of more effective drugs.
New software allows for 'decoding digital brain data' to reveal how neural activity gives rise to learning, memory and other cognitive functions. The software can be used in real time during an fMRI brain scan.
Successful results have utilized nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients.
Paleoamericans share a last common ancestor with modern native South Americans outside, rather than inside, the Americas and new findings underscore the importance of looking at both genetic and morphological evidence, each revealing different aspects of the human story, to help unravel our species' history.
Scientists have generated a new plasmid-based reverse genetics system for rotaviruses.
 

Biology News Net

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Scientists from the Senckenberg and the Giraffe Conservation Foundation have analysed the genetic relationships of all major populations of giraffe in the wild. The large study on the genetic makeup of giraffe, published today in Current Biology, shows that there are four distinct giraffe species. Until now, only one giraffe species had been recognized. The unexpected results are based on analyses using several nuclear marker genes of more than 100 animals. The new insights are set to improve protection efforts of these endangered animals in Africa.

In research published online today in Science, a team of scientists describe a new therapeutic strategy to target a hidden Achilles' heel shared by all known types of Ebola virus. Two antibodies developed with this strategy blocked the invasion of human cells by all five ebolaviruses, and one of them protected mice exposed to lethal doses of Ebola Zaire and Sudan, the two most dangerous. The team included scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Integrated Biotherapeutics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and The Scripps Research Institute.

Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have identified a brain circuit that's indispensable to the sleep-wake cycle. This same circuit is also a key component of the reward system, an archipelago of interconnected brain clusters crucial to promoting behavior necessary for animals, including humans, to survive and reproduce.

 

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