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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Solar Impulse, the aeroplane that is powered only by the sun, lands in Hawaii after making a historic 7,200km flight across the Pacific from Japan.
Scientists say a compound in cat urine changes mouse behaviour, making them less afraid of cats.
A major report warns that life in the seas will be irreversibly changed unless CO2 emissions are drastically cut.
A gene therapy has stabilised and slightly improved cystic fibrosis in some of 136 patients in a trial.
Super slow-motion video reveals the engineering secrets researchers can learn from the creatures' spring-loaded legs.
Northern Ireland is to start a limited cull of badgers as part of a research project to combat a disease in cattle that costs the taxpayer £30m a year.
The New Horizons mission to Pluto releases new colour views of the dwarf planet, revealing some intriguing dark spots.
BP has reached an $18.7bn (£12bn) settlement with the US Department of Justice following the 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill.
The founding chairman of a leading rural development and anti-poverty organisation wins the 2015 World Food Prize.
Forensic researchers develop a new method for establishing an accurate time of death after as much as 10 days.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A climate-induced change of male dragon lizards into females occurring in the wild has been confirmed for the first time, according to recent research.
The longest and most difficult leg of the Round the World Solar Flight attempted since last March by Swiss explorers Bertrand Piccard and André Borschberg ended successfully in Hawaii. At the controls of Solar Impulse 2, pilot André Borschberg landed safely in Hawaii after flying 117 hours and 52 minutes over the Pacific Ocean from Japan powered only by the sun.
To protect consumers from foodborne illness, produce farmers should wait 24 hours after a rain or irrigating their fields to harvest crops, experts say. Rain or irrigation creates soil conditions that are more hospitable to Listeria monocytogenes, which when ingested may cause the human illness Listeriosis. Waiting to harvest crops reduces the risk of exposure to the pathogen, which could land on fresh produce.
Can you imagine how subnano-scale molecules make an ultrafast rotation at a hundred billion per second? Do the ultrafast rotating subnano-scale molecules show a wave-like nature rather than particle-like behavior? Scientists took sequential 'snapshots' of ultrafast unidirectionally rotating molecules at a hundred billion per second to see for themselves.
Rapid eye movement or REM sleep actively converts waking experiences into lasting memories and abilities in young brains, reports a new study. The finding broadens the understanding of children's sleep needs and calls into question the increasing use of REM-disrupting medications such as stimulants and antidepressants.
 

Biology News Net

Neurons are a limited commodity; each of us goes through life with essentially the same set we had at birth. But these cells, whose electrical signals drive our thoughts, perceptions, and actions, are anything but static. They change and adapt in response to experience throughout our lifetimes, a process better known as learning.


The HIV capsid protein plays a critical role in the virus' life cycle. Mizzou researchers recently developed the most complete model yet of this vital protein.
HIV, or human immunodeficiency virus, is the retrovirus that leads to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome or AIDS. Globally, about 35 million people are living with HIV, which constantly adapts and mutates creating challenges for researchers. Now, scientists at the University of Missouri are gaining a clearer idea of what a key protein in HIV looks like, which will help explain its vital role in the virus' life cycle. Armed with this clearer image of the protein, researchers hope to gain a better understanding of how the body can combat the virus with the ultimate aim of producing new and more effective antiviral drugs.


Chromosomes are seen as red, and kinetochores are green. (A-B) Bivalent appears normal (green arrows). (C) Bivalent begins to hyperstretch (orange arrows).
When egg cells form with an incorrect number of chromosomes--a problem that increases with age--the result is usually a miscarriage or a genetic disease such as Down syndrome. Now, researchers at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan have used a novel imaging technique to pinpoint a significant event that leads to these types of age-related chromosomal errors. Published in Nature Communications, the study shows that as egg cells mature in older women, paired copies of matching chromosomes often separate from each other at the wrong time, leading to early division of chromosomes and their incorrect segregation into mature egg cells.


Fluorescently labeled microtubules extend from the tips of the dendrites (top) into the axon and down into the giant synaptic terminal (bottom) of a single isolated goldfish retinal bipolar cell. A loop of microtubules encircles the inner plasma membrane of the terminal and anchors mitochondria.
Researchers have discovered a thick band of microtubules in certain neurons in the retina that they believe acts as a transport road for mitochondria that help provide energy required for visual processing. The findings appear in the July issue of The Journal of General Physiology.


University of Washington researchers have discovered a link between floral scent release and circadian rhythms in the common garden petunia.
Good timing is a matter of skill. You would certainly dress up for an afternoon business meeting, but not an evening session of binge-watching Netflix. If you were just a few hours off in your wardrobe timing, your spouse might wonder why you slipped into a stiff business suit to watch "House of Cards."

 

New Scientist - Online news

From rainforest revival and green technology to social changes, the age of humans is not necessarily a one-way ticket to eco-disaster, argue three new books









From swearing to skiving or getting drunk, breaking the rules has lots of upsides, as a wide-ranging new book explains









Eadweard Muybridge's famous galloping horses are projected directly onto clouds from an aircraft in ground-breaking art installation









Close-up views of this red alga show how it gets its iridescence and changes colour in the water









An analysis of over a million games predicts whether the leading side can be overtaken before the match ends









Some ants are much lazier than others – in fact, they make a career out of it. But maybe they are more than just freeloaders









The same forces that govern a scrunched-up piece of paper can explain the numbers of folds and grooves in human, pig, elephant and rat brains









Plus casual relationships, bittersweet news about chocolate, artisanal lightbulbs and more (full text available to subscribers)









Many common spider species orient their arms and bodies into sails and their silk into anchors, allowing them to catch a breeze and sail on water









A technique that compensates for the faulty gene in the lungs of people with cystic fibrosis improves lung power – and may lead to similar approaches for other lung conditions









 
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