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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists categorise the Earth's rarest minerals with some so rare that the total global supply could fit in a thimble.
UK scientists say they have produced a new mix of cement that should be much more effective at containing nuclear waste in a deep repository.
US scientists have modelled how a 1930s-like "dustbowl" drought might impact American agriculture today, and found it to be just as damaging.
Reflecting on the significance of Thursday’s announcement – and the mind-boggling scale of the black hole merger itself.
A new app that turns a smartphone into a mobile seismometer is being rolled out by California scientists.
More than 5.5 million people worldwide are dying prematurely every year as a result of air pollution, according to new research.
The Rosetta mission team says it is time to give up hope of ever hearing again from the comet lander Philae.
Farmers are being warned to expect an outbreak of a highly infectious animal disease called bluetongue this summer.
Scientists find a wide range of ailments are strongly influenced by our Neanderthal heritage.
For the first time, scientists detect tiny, rhythmic distortions in space and time - gravitational waves - predicted by Einstein 100 years ago.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

A new insight into how sharks regenerate their teeth, which may pave the way for the development of therapies to help humans with tooth loss, has been discovered.
The discovery has implications for understanding how the human brain evolved and how it varies between people
A new strain of yeast that could improve the efficiency of making fuel from cellulosic biomass such as switchgrass has been discovered by researchers. Both the yeast strain and the method of its design could help overcome a significant bottleneck in the biofuels pipeline — namely, that the powerful solvents so good at breaking down biomass also sometimes hinder the next critical step of the process, fermentation.
Researchers have published an article that addresses the needs of cancer survivors who are at least nine years beyond an initial diagnosis. The Q &A article discusses how to better care for long-term survivors.
A team of paleontologists has identified several new types of dinosaurs from fossil evidence discovered in eastern Idaho, demonstrating the presence of a much more diverse group of theropods in the area than was previously known.
 

Biology News Net


Recurrent DSB clusters in neural stem/progenitor cells are shown.
The genome of developing brain cells harbors 27 clusters or hotspots where its DNA is much more likely to break in some places than others, researchers from the Program in Cellular and Molecular Medicine (PCMM) at Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute report in the journal Cell. Those hotspots appear in genes associated with brain tumors and a number of neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric conditions, raising new questions about these conditions' origins, as well as how the brain generates a diversity of circuitry during development.


A major coral bleaching event took place on this part of the Great Barrier Reef in Australia.
A study at Oregon State University has concluded that significant outbreaks of viruses may be associated with coral bleaching events, especially as a result of multiple environmental stresses.


Graphic of microtubules, the 'railway network' within every cell of the human body
Researchers from the University of Warwick have discovered how cells in the human body build their own 'railway networks', throwing light on how diseases such as bowel cancer work. The results have just been published in Nature Scientific Reports.

A new imaging technique has allowed researchers at North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and the University of Pittsburgh to see how DNA loops around a protein that aids in the formation of a special structure in telomeres. The work provides new insights into the structure of telomeres and how they are maintained.

If you're fat, can you blame it on your genes? The answer is a qualified yes. Maybe. Under certain circumstances. Researchers are moving towards a better understanding of some of the roots of obesity.

 

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