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Science/biology news

Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.


BBC News - Science & Environment

The gouge in the ground likely made by Europe's Schiaparelli probe as it hit the surface of Mars on Wednesday has been imaged by an American satellite.
Hundreds of snow leopards are being poached in retaliation for livestock losses every year across the high mountain ranges of Asia, says a new report.
UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon tells the world's mayors they face making 'tough decisions' to ensure future generations live in a safe and sustainable urban world.
Some of the giants of the dinosaur family may have arisen in South America and crossed over Antarctica to Australia about 100 million years ago, new fossil evidence suggests.
Europe's Schiaparelli lander did not behave as expected as it headed down to the surface of Mars on Wednesday, data shows.
Scores of spectacular and rare undersea species have been found on expeditions to some of the deepest trenches in the Pacific Ocean.
Voles appear to have been roasted for food by Neolithic people living on Orkney 5,000 years ago, archaeological evidence shows.
Cave art from the Ice Age has helped solve the origins of Europe's largest land mammal - the modern European bison.
The eggs of a mosquito capable of transmitting tropical diseases, including the Zika virus, are found for the first time in the UK.
A photo of an orangutan climbing high into a tree to reach some figs takes the top honour in the 2016 Wildlife Photographer of the Year competition.

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The U.S. CDC is recommending that 11- to 12-year-olds receive two doses of HPV vaccine at least six months apart rather than the previously recommended three doses to protect against cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections.
Researchers have announced the naming of Savannasaurus elliottorum, a new genus and species of dinosaur from western Queensland, Australia. The bones come from the Winton Formation, a geological deposit approximately 95 million years old. Savannasaurus was a medium-sized titanosaur, approximately half the length of a basketball court, with a long neck and a relatively short tail.
Perhaps the bias against left-handers dates back much further than we thought. By examining striations on teeth of a Homo habilis fossil, researchers have found the earliest evidence for right-handedness in the fossil record dating back 1.8 million years.
Humans may be able to respond better to exercise during the daytime, suggests new research. Oxygen and the internal clock "do a dance together" in muscle cells to make energy, they say. The discovery provides insights that could lead to optimizing muscle function.
Lignin is a bulky chain of molecules found in wood and is usually discarded during biofuel production. But in a new method to reduce our reliance on fossil fuels, the simple addition of formaldehyde could turn it into the main focus.

Biology News Net

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Scientists from the Senckenberg and the Giraffe Conservation Foundation have analysed the genetic relationships of all major populations of giraffe in the wild. The large study on the genetic makeup of giraffe, published today in Current Biology, shows that there are four distinct giraffe species. Until now, only one giraffe species had been recognized. The unexpected results are based on analyses using several nuclear marker genes of more than 100 animals. The new insights are set to improve protection efforts of these endangered animals in Africa.

In research published online today in Science, a team of scientists describe a new therapeutic strategy to target a hidden Achilles' heel shared by all known types of Ebola virus. Two antibodies developed with this strategy blocked the invasion of human cells by all five ebolaviruses, and one of them protected mice exposed to lethal doses of Ebola Zaire and Sudan, the two most dangerous. The team included scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Integrated Biotherapeutics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and The Scripps Research Institute.

Stanford University School of Medicine scientists have identified a brain circuit that's indispensable to the sleep-wake cycle. This same circuit is also a key component of the reward system, an archipelago of interconnected brain clusters crucial to promoting behavior necessary for animals, including humans, to survive and reproduce.