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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Ancient grasses from the Pampas of Argentina were preserved in glass when asteroids struck the area, scientists report.
US company SpaceX launches its latest re-supply mission to the International Space Station, sending up a Dragon freighter to rendezvous with the orbiting platform on Sunday.
Female insects with 'penises' have been discovered in Brazil - the first example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia.
A planet that is close in size to the Earth and that could hold water on its surface has been identified by the Kepler telescope.
A British project to capture CO2 and bury it under the North Sea looks set to receive a 300m-euro boost from the EU.
Scientists say they have discovered what could be the birth of a new moon in the rings of Saturn.
The first images come back from the radar satellite launched as part of the European Union's new flagship Earth-observation project.
Artists' brains are structurally different to non-artists in areas relating to fine motor movements and visual imagery, a study finds.
The boom and bust of men's beard fashions may mirror Darwinian selection, scientists say.
Scientists use impact craters to work out the characteristics of the air on Mars 3.6 billion years ago.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The human body is fine-tuned to Earth's gravity. Scientists are now conducting an experiment on the International Space Station (ISS) to study whether this also applies to human cells. We know the effect of gravity on muscles, bones and joints inside out; it has been studied extensively in medicine for centuries. For a long time, however, exactly how gravity affects the cells remained a mystery.
A SpaceX Dragon spacecraft full of NASA cargo, experiments and equipment blazed into orbit Friday, April 18, aboard the company's Falcon 9 rocket. The astronauts aboard the International Space Station will unload the supplies after the Dragon arrives at the orbiting research laboratory.
Psychologists have made a brain-related discovery that could revolutionize doctors' perception and treatment of attention-deficit disorders. This discovery opens up the possibility that environmental and/or genetic factors may hinder or suppress a specific brain activity that the researchers have identified as helping us prevent distraction.
The adage "Everyone complains about the weather but nobody does anything about it" may one day be obsolete if researchers further develop a new technique to aim a high-energy laser beam into clouds to make it rain or trigger lightning. Other possible uses of this technique could be used in long-distance sensors and spectrometers to identify chemical makeup.
Seeds that sprout as soon as they're planted may be good news for a garden. But in the wild, a plant whose seeds sprouted at the first warm spell or rainy day would risk disaster. More than just an insurance policy against late frosts or unexpected dry spells, it turns out that seed dormancy has long-term advantages too: plants whose seeds put off sprouting until conditions are more certain give rise to more species.
 

Biology News Net


This shows the female penis of N. aurora.
Researchers reporting in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on April 17 have discovered little-known cave insects with rather novel sex lives. The Brazilian insects, which represent four distinct but related species in the genus Neotrogla, are the first example of an animal with sex-reversed genitalia.

Scientists have uncovered a new way the immune system may fight cancers and viral infections. The finding could aid efforts to use immune cells to treat illness.


This shows active droplets.
Droplets of filamentous material enclosed in a lipid membrane: these are the models of a "simplified" cell used by the SISSA physicists Luca Giomi and Antonio DeSimone, who simulated the spontaneous emergence of cell motility and division - that is, features of living material - in inanimate "objects". The research is one of the cover stories of the April 10th online issue of the journal Physical Review Letters.


Here are Cian O'Donnell and Terry Sejnowski.
Scientists at the Salk Institute have created a new model of memory that explains how neurons retain select memories a few hours after an event.


Mitochondria in hepatitis C-infected cells (bottom row) are self-destructing. The self-annihilation process explains the persistance and virulence of the virus in human liver cells.
Researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a mechanism that explains why people with the hepatitis C virus get liver disease and why the virus is able to persist in the body for so long.

 

New Scientist - Online news

If a crisis throws everyone offline, getting reconnected can be tougher than it looks, finds Hal Hodson






Epilepsy, psychiatric breakdown, sleep disorders – for all the crudity of 16th-century healthcare, Shakespeare's observations still inspire doctors today (full text available to subscribers)






SpaceX has launched its third cargo mission to the ISS, carrying gear that includes robot legs, a collapsible garden and a microbes from a dino fossil






From a supernova in 1572 to the discovery of Jupiter's four biggest moons – astronomical discoveries of Shakespeare's time may pop up in his work (full text available to subscribers)






The lunar spacecraft has been intentionally smashed into the far side of the moon after months spent measuring dust and testing laser-based broadband






One of the huge 747s that gave piggyback rides to space shuttles is headed to Houston to star in an 8-storey-tall museum exhibit






In the early 1980s, a previously innocuous bacterium gained the grim weapons it needed to cause necrotising fasciitis, reveals a global genetics study






Defenestrations in history, global flattening squashed, memetic engineering and you, and more (full text available to subscribers)






Flu cases across the US can be accurately estimated using Wikipedia searches, and fluey tweets from Twitter users also give the game away






Found by NASA's Kepler telescope, the world is slightly bigger than Earth and orbits an active red star that could drive dazzling sky shows






 
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