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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Belief in the reality of climate change has risen among the British public, partly because of the 2013 winter floods, according to a report.
London's Natural History Museum is re-modelling its entrance, moving out the famous Diplodocus skeleton and moving in the bones of a blue whale.
Listening to icebergs could help to assess the extent of glacier melt, a study suggests.
An ancient skull discovered in Israel could shed light on the migration of modern humans out of Africa some 60,000 years ago.
Scientists at the Institut Pasteur in France who are tracking the Ebola outbreak in Guinea say the virus has mutated.
Royal Dutch Shell revives Arctic drilling plans, despite announcing a $15bn cut in global spending and profit figures that disappointed investors.
Astra Zeneca announces a research programme to develop a generation of medicines to treat the genetic causes of many debilitating diseases.
The Scottish government announces a block on planned fracking operations, pending the outcome of further inquiries.
Nasa's Curiosity rover gets straight back to work after a software upgrade by drilling a new test hole.
Experts are pinning their hopes on in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) to save the northern white rhino from extinction.
 

News -- ScienceDaily

Researchers have induced human embryonic stem cells to self-organize into a three-dimensional structure similar to the cerebellum, providing tantalizing clues in the quest to recreate neural structures in the laboratory. One of the primary goals of stem-cell research is to be able to replace damaged body parts with tissues grown from undifferentiated stem cells. For the nervous system, this is a particular challenge because not only do specific neurons need to be generated, but they must also be coaxed into connecting to each other in very specific ways.
Earth's crust under Iceland is rebounding as global warming melts the island's great ice caps. In south-central Iceland some sites are moving upward as much as 1.4 inches (35 mm) per year. A new paper is the first to show the current fast uplift of the Icelandic crust is a result of accelerated melting of the island's glaciers and coincides with the onset of warming that began about 30 years ago, the researchers said.
A skull provides direct anatomical evidence that fills a problematic time gap of modern human migration into Europe. It is also the first proof that anatomically modern humans existed at the same time as Neanderthals in the same geographical area.
The number of portable biodetectors has grown exponentially in the last decade. During this time, first responders could try different devices, but they didn’t have independent, standardized comparisons to determine which devices better met their needs. Now they do.
Researchers found that data gathered from geo-stationary satellites -- satellites orbiting Earth at about 22,000 miles above the equator and commonly used for telecommunications and weather imaging -- can greatly improve air-quality forecasting.
 

Biology News Net


XPC DNA repair protein shown in two modes, patrolling undamaged DNA (in green) and bound to DNA damage site (magenta, with blue XPC insert opening the site).
Sites where DNA is damaged may cause a molecule that slides along the DNA strand to scan for damage to slow on its patrol, delaying it long enough to recognize and initiate repair. The finding suggests that the delay itself may be the key that allows the protein molecule to find its target, according to researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Scientists have shed light on how naturally occurring mutations can be introduced into our DNA.


Scientists took a computational approach using the Stampede and Lonestar supercomputers to compare lab data with reference genomes of over a thousand strains of Arabidopsis sampled throughout Europe and Asia.
Scientists using supercomputers found genes sensitive to cold and drought in a plant help it survive climate change. These findings increase basic understanding of plant adaptation and can be applied to improve crops.


This image of a mouse brain shows the two neurons, CAMKII (in red) that triggers thirst and VGAT (in green) that inhibit thirst.
NEW YORK, NY (January 26, 2015)--Neurons that trigger our sense of thirst--and neurons that turn it off--have been identified by Columbia University Medical Center neuroscientists. The paper was published today in the online edition of Nature.

Scientists have identified a gene that helps regulate how well nerves of the central nervous system are insulated, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report.

 

New Scientist - Online news

Finding a boat where you want to put your building can be costly. A data analytics start-up will help companies guess what's in the ground before they dig






Once only possible in an MRI scanner, vibrating pads and electrode caps could soon help locked-in people communicate on a day-to-day basis






The armoured harvestman is too hard a nut for most predators to crack. But the recluse spider uses a martial arts move to sting it where it hurts






It's a trendy field but is transcranial direct current stimulation really all that? For the second time, a review of studies has failed to find the claimed results






These two ants seem to get along even though one is more than three times the size of the other. Turns out it's ants of the same stature that end up as rivals






The next-generation internet could come from above, with fleets of satellites delivering broadband to under-served areas of the world






If all goes to plan, the UK will launch a telescope to find out more about known exoplanets' atmospheres in four years






Lethargic mice unexpectedly perk up when injected with immune cells from bullied mice, a discovery which could point to new depression treatments






An initiative in New York is using machine learning to figure out who's most likely to donate blood - and what's best to say to encourage them






The ultimate fate of waste plastic is hazy – but we know future geologists will find traces of a fleeting era written in the stones. Welcome to the Plasticene (full text available to subscribers)






 
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