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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

In what will be its greatest challenge yet, the zero-fuel aeroplane Solar Impulse will soon try to fly non-stop from China to Hawaii - a journey of more than 8,000km across the Pacific Ocean.
Islamic State's capture of Palmyra in Syria threatens the last surviving colony of the northern bald ibis in the Middle East, experts says.
Jonathan Amos gets a first peek inside the UK aerospace laboratory where Europe's ExoMars rover will be assembled.
Renowned mathematician John Nash, subject of the film A Beautiful Mind, dies in a New Jersey taxi crash with his wife.
Beavers should be resident in Scotland says the National Trust as it announces its support for reintroduction projects.
Purring spiders use leaves as microphones and speakers to transmit their purring courtship song to a female, scientists find.
Thousands of species of the ocean's tiniest organisms are revealed in a series of studies.
Satellites have recorded a big sudden change in the behaviour of glaciers on the Antarctica Peninsula, according to a UK-based team.
Researchers discover the 425-million-year-old remains of a new species of parasite - still clamped to the host animal it invaded.
Swedish researchers say that dogs may have been domesticated much earlier than some studies suggest.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Six mRNA isoforms (bits of genetic material) produced by ovarian cancer cells but not normal cells have been identified by scientists, opening up the possibility that they could be used to diagnose early-stage ovarian cancer. What’s more, several of the mRNA isoforms code for unique proteins that could be targeted with new therapeutics.
Oscillations of activity observed in the brain could have a role in resetting the sensitivity of neurons after eye movements. Further results suggest these waves could also have a role in supporting the brain's representation of space.
Frailer older patients are at higher risk of readmission to hospital or death within 30 days after discharge from a general internal medicine ward, but health care professionals can assess who is at risk using the Clinical Frailty Scale, according to a study.
You know the old saying: Location, location, location? It turns out that it applies to the Amazon rainforest, too. New work illustrates a hidden tapestry of chemical variation across the lowland Peruvian Amazon, with plants in different areas producing an array of chemicals that changes across the region's topography.
Certain special fats found in blood are essential for human brain growth and function, new research suggests. New published studies show that mutations in the protein Mfsd2a causes impaired brain development in humans. Mfsd2a is the transporter in the brain for a special type of fat called lysophosphatidylcholines (LPCs) -- composed of essential fatty acids like omega-3.
 

Biology News Net


Chema and Rumumba, two low-ranking immigrant female chimpanzees, take turns grooming each other in Gombe National Park, Tanzania.
Low-ranking "new girl" chimpanzees seek out other gal pals with similar status, finds a new study of social relationships in the wild apes.


The Tara Oceans expedition collected these small zooplanktonic animals in the Indian Ocean: a molluscan pteropod on the right, and 2 crustacean copepods. On the left is a fragment of...
In five related reports in this issue of the journal Science, a multinational team of researchers who spent three and a half years sampling the ocean's sunlit upper layers aboard the schooner Tara unveil the first officially reported global analyses of the Tara Oceans consortium. Planktonic life in the ocean is far more diverse than scientists knew, these reports show. They provide new resources for cataloguing the ocean's numerous planktonic organisms, which -- though critical to life on Earth, providing half the oxygen generated annually through photosynthesis, for example -- have largely been uncharacterized. The reports also reveal how planktonic life is distributed and how planktonic species interact, and they suggest that these organisms' interactions, more so than environmental conditions, help explain their community structures.


Phages infect bacteria and are able to transfer genes during this process.
Bacteria resistant to antibiotics are on the rise. There are different explanations for how resistances are transferred. Researchers from the Vetmeduni Vienna found phages in chicken meat that are able to transfer antimicrobial resistance to bacteria. Phages are viruses that exclusively infect bacteria. They can contribute to the spread of antimicrobial resistance. The findings may also be relevant for clinical settings. The study was published in the journal Applied and Environmental Microbiology.


This image shows the epithelial lining of the gut.
Scientists and clinicians on the Norwich Research Park have carried out the first detailed study of how our intestinal tract changes as we age, and how this determines our overall health.

A cartwheeling spider, a bird-like dinosaur and a fish that wriggles around on the sea floor to create a circular nesting site are among the species identified by the SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry (ESF) as the Top 10 New Species for 2015.

 

New Scientist - Online news

The public may balk at geoengineering, but we've got to think boldly if we're going to protect our coasts, says glaciologist Slawek Tulaczyk (full text available to subscribers)







Ragweed pollen is the bane of many lives in the US, and climate change could help the plant become much more common in Europe by 2050







Playing shoot 'em ups has a surprising benefit – it can train your brain to sharpen your vision (full text available to subscribers)







With the science nearly upon us, a new book highlights the ethical and logistical issues of bringing back proxies of extinct animals such as the woolly mammoth







The popular belief that dyslexia is caused by sight problems has been blown out of the water by a study of 6000 school children. So what does cause it?







Do the huge craters pockmarking Siberia herald a release of underground methane that could exceed our worst climate change fears? (full text available to subscribers)







Their evolutionary arms race is a wonder to behold, but the UK's cuckoos are vanishing at an alarming rate, says zoologist Nick Davies (full text available to subscribers)







From a row about time to a bad paper on black holes, there's lots to learn about Einstein from a clutch of books published at the centenary of general relativity







When oil prices crashed, ecologists hoped the Arctic would get some breathing space. Instead, the military occupied this pristine wilderness, says Fred Pearce (full text available to subscribers)







Novel kinds of artificial eye lenses are allowing both the short-sighted and long-sighted to see fine without glasses, even for reading (full text available to subscribers)







 
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