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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Changing rules on best before dates and the sale of "wonky vegetables" could help cut waste, MPs say.
The DNA of extinct humans can be retrieved from sediment in caves - even in the absences of skeletal remains.
The US president said he hoped the new order would create "thousands and thousands" of jobs.
The Cassini spacecraft is back in contact with Earth after diving in between Saturn's rings and cloudtops.
The UK Government has lost a court bid to delay publication of its air pollution strategy.
A study that claims humans reached the Americas 130,000 years ago, much earlier than previously suggested, has run into controversy.
New recordings show newborn humpback whales and mothers "whisper" to each other, to avoid predators.
The deepest and oldest waters on Earth are not immune from contamination, warn scientists.
Government rapped again for failure to tighten flood-prevention rules on new homes
Scientists have calculated the optimal strategy for throwing something accurately, even a ball of paper.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

As summer nears and more people prepare to go out in the sun, a dermatologist and dermatopathologist discusses the conflicting recommendations over full body skin inspections.
A new use for the ubiquitous PowerPoint slide has now been discovered: Producing self-folding three-dimensional origami structures from photocurable liquid polymers.
The 2006 Soy Moratorium had a larger effect in reducing deforestation in the Amazon than has been previously understood, outlines a new study.
Studying how and why bridges have collapsed in the past identifies the limitation of current risk assessment approach and demonstrates the value of new perspectives on climate change impact.
A new study examining the muscular system of bonobos provides firsthand evidence that the rare great ape species may be more closely linked, anatomically, to human ancestors than common chimpanzees.
 

Biology News Net

EPFL scientists have carried out a genomic and evolutionary study of a large and enigmatic family of human proteins, to demonstrate that it is responsible for harnessing the millions of transposable elements in the human genome. The work reveals the largely species-specific gene-regulatory networks that impact all of human biology, in both health and disease.

In a first-of-its-kind look at human kidney development, researchers at The Saban Research Institute of Children's Hospital Los Angeles have isolated human nephron progenitor (NP) cells. Their results, published online in the journal Stem Cell Translational Medicine, will help scientists understand how these progenitor cells become renal cells in the developing fetus, and possibly offer a future way to foster renal regeneration after chronic kidney failure or acute injury.

For the first time, researchers from the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute and their collaborators have been able to identify in human cancers two characteristic patterns of DNA damage caused by ionising radiation. These fingerprint patterns may now enable doctors to identify which tumours have been caused by radiation, and investigate if they should be treated differently.

Scientists from the Senckenberg and the Giraffe Conservation Foundation have analysed the genetic relationships of all major populations of giraffe in the wild. The large study on the genetic makeup of giraffe, published today in Current Biology, shows that there are four distinct giraffe species. Until now, only one giraffe species had been recognized. The unexpected results are based on analyses using several nuclear marker genes of more than 100 animals. The new insights are set to improve protection efforts of these endangered animals in Africa.

In research published online today in Science, a team of scientists describe a new therapeutic strategy to target a hidden Achilles' heel shared by all known types of Ebola virus. Two antibodies developed with this strategy blocked the invasion of human cells by all five ebolaviruses, and one of them protected mice exposed to lethal doses of Ebola Zaire and Sudan, the two most dangerous. The team included scientists from Albert Einstein College of Medicine, U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID), Integrated Biotherapeutics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, and The Scripps Research Institute.

 

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