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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Two dinosaur skeletons have been unearthed in Mongolia, solving a mystery that has baffled palaeontologists for 50 years.
Wild chimps carry out night-time crop raids, footage reveals, suggesting the animals are being pushed into risky foraging behaviour.
DNA analysis of a 45,000-year-old human has helped scientists pinpoint when our ancestors interbred with Neanderthals.
A black and white image of lions resting on a rock outcrop in the Serengeti has won the 2014 Wildlife Photographer of the Year award.
The UK's wind farms generated more power than its nuclear power stations on Tuesday, the National Grid says.
Scientists have turned a laser into a reversible "tractor beam" that can repel or attract objects.
The EU's decision to ban the use of some pesticides could threaten UK crops, increase food prices and hit farmers' profits, a report claims.
A paralysed man becomes the first in the world to walk again following a pioneering therapy which involved transplanting cells from his nose into his severed spinal cord.
Treatments to tackle the Ebola outbreak in West Africa should become available in the coming weeks and months, says the World Health Organization.
IPCC expert says EU's plan consigns future leaders to “extraordinary and unprecedented” CO2 cuts.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

After 116 days of being subjected to extremely frigid temperatures like that in space, the heart of the James Webb Space Telescope, the Integrated Science Instrument Module and its sensitive instruments, emerged unscathed from the thermal vacuum chamber at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland.
Scientists have revealed that feather shafts are made of a multi-layered fibrous composite material, much like carbon fiber, which allows the feather to bend and twist to cope with the stresses of flight. Since their appearance over 150 million years ago, feather shafts (rachises) have evolved to be some of the lightest, strongest and most fatigue resistant natural structures.
Chemists have devised a way to see the internal structures of electronic waves trapped in carbon nanotubes by external electrostatic charges. Carbon nanotubes have been touted as exceptional materials with unique properties that allow for extremely efficient charge and energy transport, with the potential to open the way for new, more efficient types of electronic and photovoltaic devices. However, these traps, or defects, in ultra-thin nanotubes can compromise their effectiveness.
Medical practices in less competitive health-care markets charge more for services, according to a study. The study, based on U.S. health-care data from 2010, provides important new information about the effects of competition on prices for office visits paid by preferred provider organizations, known more commonly as PPOs. PPOs are the most common type of health insurance plan held by privately insured people in the United States.
Researchers know that alcohol-dependent individuals (ALC) sustain neurocognitive impairment even after detoxification. A new study examines specific domains of cognitive recovery in conjunction with smoking status. Findings show that smoking status influenced the rate and level of neurocognitive recovery during eight months of abstinence in the ALC group.
 

Biology News Net

Researchers have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells. The probe binds to a voltage-activated potassium ion channel subtype, lighting up when the channel is turned off and dimming when it is activated.

The way in which male moths locate females flying hundreds of meters away has long been a mystery to scientists.

Scientists tracing the real-time impact of viruses in the wild have found that entire amphibian communities are being killed off by closely related viruses introduced to mountainous areas of northern Spain.

A new discovery relating to one of the most common processes in human cells is being described as a 'paradigm shift' in understanding.

Scientists in Cambridge have found hidden signatures in the brains of people in a vegetative state, which point to networks that could support consciousness even when a patient appears to be unconscious and unresponsive. The study could help doctors identify patients who are aware despite being unable to communicate.

 

New Scientist - Online news

Two million years ago we were just your average primate – then we started to have some revolutionary ideas and human evolution went into hyper-drive (full text available to subscribers)






Incredible night-vision videos of daring raids on farmers' fields are the first to show chimpanzees operating under cover of darkness






The oldest genome from a modern human reveals that modern humans with modern behaviour interbred with Neanderthals as they spread into Eurasia






All the latest on newscientist.com: quantum computer buyers' guide, life on Mars might be short, brain barrier opened to treat cancer and more






If our best sign yet of dark matter is what it seems, then the supermassive black hole at the centre of our galaxy is a complex beast






Changing entrenched attitudes that trivialise cyber-harassment against women will take more than harsh sentences, says law professor Danielle Citron






Ultrasound has been used to open the brain's protective sheath in people with aggressive brain tumours – to deliver chemo drugs directly to cancer cells






Use of a cattle drug that has devastated vulture populations in India is in decline, offering hope of recovery – but vultures in Europe may now be at risk






The Mars One project aims to send people to the Red Planet, but a new analysis suggests oxygen poisoning from growing their own food could kill them






A charming and poetic account of apiculture in Mark Winston's Bee Time reminds us why an ancient partnership between humans and bees needs saving






 
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