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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

A new study says the production of beef is around 10 times more damaging to the environment than any other form of livestock.
The Kepler Space Telescope has spotted a distant world with the longest year of any planet in the mission's inventory.
Some seals prefer to forage for food at offshore wind farms, UK study suggests.
The demand for ship identification and tracking data acquired by satellites is growing rapidly.
The European Commission has responded to criticism of its billion-euro Human Brain Project, declaring confidence that objections will be satisfied.
A sea eagle chick, featured on BBC Springwatch, which was seen being pushed out of the nest by an intruder eagle successfully flies the nest.
At least six passengers on the Malaysia Airlines plane were heading to a major international Aids conference in Australia.
British astronaut Tim Peake has picked "Principia" to be the name of his mission into space next year.
Conservationists call on the public to help survey the state of Britain's countryside by counting butterflies.
Scientists have developed a highly advanced bird song decoder, which can automatically identify the call of a vast variety of birds.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Coaches tend to overreact to close losses, and their hasty personnel adjustments tend to backfire in the long run, research shows. Researchers focused on whether coaches adjusted their personnel following games where the margin of victory or defeat was small. After narrow wins, coaches changed their starting lineup one-fourth of the time. But after narrow losses, they changed their starting lineup one-third of the time.
Their scruffy beards weren't ironic, but there are reasons mammoths and mastodons could have been the hipsters of the Ice Age. According to new research, the famously fuzzy relatives of elephants liked living in Greater Cincinnati long before it was trendy -- at the end of the last ice age. A new study shows the ancient proboscideans enjoyed the area so much they likely were year-round residents and not nomadic migrants as previously thought.
Statistical analysis of average global temperatures between 1998 and 2013 shows that the slowdown in global warming during this period is consistent with natural variations in temperature, according to research. The study concludes that a natural cooling fluctuation during this period largely masked the warming effects of a continued increase in human-made emissions of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases.
New research focuses on the development of a novel, matrix-free method for generating 3-D cell spheroids that are combining knowledge from bioprinting methods on 2-D surfaces to link 3-D cellular structures.
For the first time, researchers have used a cutting-edge microscope to study the relationship between the atomic geometry of a ribbon of graphene and its electrical properties.
 

Biology News Net

Researchers at the BBSRC-funded Babraham Institute, in collaboration with the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute Single Cell Genomics Centre, have developed a powerful new single-cell technique to help investigate how the environment affects our development and the traits we inherit from our parents. The technique can be used to map all of the 'epigenetic marks' on the DNA within a single cell. This single-cell approach will boost understanding of embryonic development, could enhance clinical applications like cancer therapy and fertility treatments, and has the potential to reduce the number of mice currently needed for this research.

The genetic blueprint is an invaluable resource to plant science researchers and breeders. For the first time, they have at their disposal a set of tools enabling them to rapidly locate specific genes on individual wheat chromosomes throughout the genome. Jorge Dubcovsky, Professor at the University of California Davis, USA, says that these results "have been a fantastic resource for our laboratory. The development of genome specific primers, which used to take several weeks of work, can now be done in hours. Mapping of any sequence to the specific chromosome arm can now be done in silico in minutes. In addition to the acceleration of day to day work in wheat genetics, this resource has made possible analyses and discoveries at the genome level that were not possible before."

Researchers have created the first comprehensive library of genetic switches in plants, setting the stage for scientists around the globe to better understand how plants adapt to environmental changes and to design more robust plants for future food security.

Birdsongs automatically decoded by computer scientists

 

New Scientist - Online news

Besides the death toll and obvious physical damage, Israel's attacks will leave many of Gaza's surviving children with post-traumatic stress disorder






Corralling light using laser-heated air can let you send signals vast distances without the light getting lost. It could be used to detect explosives at a distance






A hideously complex mass of equations can tell you about air flow over your boat, F1 car or bike – while also making the prettiest images in engineering






Edible seaweed is not only nutritional, it's delicious too – but don't take our word for it, try it for yourself






Seaweed from vast underwater farms could fill our tanks with biofuel, clean up pollution and even harvest uranium. Meet the vanguard of the marine revolution (full text available to subscribers)






The idea of human as networker is fast replacing the idea of human as toolmaker in the story of the human brain, claim two new books on our evolution






In its day, this CIAM-NASA HFL "Kholod" scramjet was the fastest thing in the air. Just the thing for your private museum






All the latest on newscientist.com: the other side of a black hole, self-sculpting rock arches, hungry seals at wind farms, smart goggles and more






An augmented reality headset may allow the pilots of business jets and helicopters to take off and land in fog, torrential rain, snow and dust storms






Grey and harbour seals in the North Sea weave in and out of offshore wind farms in search of fish, which gather around turbines






 
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