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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

The UK's chief scientist says the oceans face a serious and growing risk from man-made carbon emissions.
The EU agrees what it calls "the world's most ambitious" deal to cut greenhouse gas emissions by at least 40% by 2030, overcoming deep divisions.
The European Space Agency releases a short scifi movie to promote its audacious bid to land on a comet next month.
Surgeons in Australia say they have performed the first heart transplant using a "dead heart".
Skywatchers in North America are treated to the final eclipse of the year.
Campaigners start legal action to prevent the government from capturing a family of wild beavers.
Small tags stuck to the undersides of baby loggerhead turtles are used to follow the animals' frenetic first hours.
The extinction of the biggest shark known to science may have triggered whales to grow to their current hefty sizes, a study suggests.
Farmland birds are at their lowest levels since records began, according to government figures.
DNA analysis of a 45,000-year-old human has helped scientists pinpoint when our ancestors interbred with Neanderthals.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Ebola virus disease epidemic already devastating swaths of West Africa will likely get far worse in the coming weeks and months unless international commitments are significantly and immediately increased, new research predicts.
Using extremely faint light from galaxies 10.8-billion light years away, scientists have created one of the most complete, three-dimensional maps of a slice of the adolescent universe. The map shows a web of hydrogen gas that varies from low to high density at a time when the universe was made of a fraction of the dark matter we see.
Computer-Aided Nodule Assessment and Risk Yield, is a novel software tool that can automatically quantitate adenocarcinoma pulmonary nodule characteristics from non-invasive high resolution computed tomography images and stratify non-small cell lung cancer patients into risk groups that have significantly different disease-free survival outcome.
Sixteen institutions across Europe collaborated together to show for the first time that a semi-quantitative anaplastic lymphoma kinase protein expression test, immunohistochemistry, is reliable amongst several laboratories and reviewers when test methodology and result interpretation are strictly standardized and the scoring pathologists are appropriately trained on the test.
Volatile rainstorms drive complex landscape changes in deserts, particularly in dryland channels, which are shaped by flash flooding. Paradoxically, such desert streams have surprisingly simple topography with smooth, straight and symmetrical form that until now has defied explanation.
 

Biology News Net

Researchers have created a cellular probe that combines a tarantula toxin with a fluorescent compound to help scientists observe electrical activity in neurons and other cells. The probe binds to a voltage-activated potassium ion channel subtype, lighting up when the channel is turned off and dimming when it is activated.

The way in which male moths locate females flying hundreds of meters away has long been a mystery to scientists.

Scientists tracing the real-time impact of viruses in the wild have found that entire amphibian communities are being killed off by closely related viruses introduced to mountainous areas of northern Spain.

A new discovery relating to one of the most common processes in human cells is being described as a 'paradigm shift' in understanding.

Scientists in Cambridge have found hidden signatures in the brains of people in a vegetative state, which point to networks that could support consciousness even when a patient appears to be unconscious and unresponsive. The study could help doctors identify patients who are aware despite being unable to communicate.

 

New Scientist - Online news

Loggerhead turtles from Cape Verde complete an epic sprint before they turn into chilled-out turtle surfers, like the ones in Finding Nemo






Litmus paper embedded with DNA from jellyfish and other organisms has the potential to identify any biological molecule – changing how infections are diagnosed






Private company Planetary Resources, which one day hopes to mine asteroids, is preparing to launch a prototype of a telescope designed to find them






All the latest on newscientist.com: humanity's next 1000 years, future Ebola explosions, slumdog mapmakers, seeing brain chatter, Interstellar and more






Travel bans aren't the answer: distancing ourselves from countries and people afflicted with Ebola could prove tragic for the world






Australia's banded stilts sense distant rains and then fly more than 2000 kilometres to find a bonanza of freshly hatched shrimp






The Missing Maps initiative aims to chart slums around the world as a way of fighting disease outbreaks and hastening development






The first model to explore how healthcare efforts affect Ebola's final toll suggests cases could hit 700,000, but may reach many millions if efforts falter






Data from the European Space Agency's Rosetta probe reveals that eau de comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko smells awful – but that's good news






Terms and conditions refused, I hereby assign my first-born, watch don't need no education and more (full text available to subscribers)






 
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