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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Scientists and government officials are meeting in Copenhagen to edit a report on the causes, impact and solutions to global warming.
Scientists confirm that a frog found living in New York City wetlands is a new species.
The builders of an unmanned supply rocket which exploded on the way to the International Space Station have vowed to find the cause of the failure.
Australian scientists say they have successfully tested a vaccine aimed at protecting wild koalas from chlamydia.
An innate ability some people have to manipulate their vocal frequency could be the key to sounding charismatic, according to new research.
About 2,000 hectares of fertile land are lost each day due to damage caused by salt, according to a UN analysis.
A new study confirms that giant tortoise numbers on one of the Galapagos Islands have bounced back thanks to captive breeding.
Plans are unveiled for a £97m supercomputer which will boost the Met Office's computing capacity by 13 times, improving weather forecasting and climate modelling.
Google is attempting to diagnose cancers, heart attack risks and other ailments with a system that combines nanoparticles and a wrist-worn sensor.
Two genes are associated with repeat violent offenders, according to a genetic analysis of almost 900 criminals in Finland.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

The Wallops Incident Response Team completed today an initial assessment of Wallops Island, Virginia, following the catastrophic failure of Orbital Science Corp.'s Antares rocket shortly after liftoff at 6:22 p.m. EDT Tuesday, Oct. 28, from Pad 0A of the Mid-Atlantic Regional Spaceport at NASA's Wallops Flight Facility in Virginia.
New insight into the function of an enzyme related to the BRCA1 breast-cancer protein has been released by researchers. The study produced the first detailed working image of an enzyme in a group that is associated with many types of cancer. The researchers obtained the first crystal structure of a gene-regulation enzyme working on a nucleosome. The image reveals previously unknown information about how the enzyme attaches to its nucleosome target.
Researchers have developed a mathematical model that shows how changes in congressional voting districts affect election outcomes. Focusing on the last election, they show the outcome of the 2012 US House of Representatives elections in North Carolina would have been very different had the state's congressional districts been drawn with only the legal requirements of redistricting in mind. The researchers hope the study will bolster calls for redistricting reform in 2016.
With an eye toward making better running robots, researchers have made surprising new findings about some of nature's most energy efficient bipeds -- running birds. Their skills may have evolved from the time of the dinosaurs and they may now be superior to any other bipedal runners -- including humans.
Is it possible that hearing loss in one infant from a pair of twins can affect the mother’s speech to both infants? A new acoustics study zeroes in on this question and suggests that not only is this alteration of speech entirely possible, but that mothers speak to both infants as if they are hearing impaired.
 

Biology News Net


A recent study at the University of Gothenburg sheds light on the mystery of the biological clock that governs fertility.
Researchers at the University of Gothenburg have identified the biological clock that governs female fertility. The discovery represents a major contribution to research aimed at finding medical approaches to treating infertility in women.

A population of endangered giant tortoises, which once dwindled to just over a dozen, has recovered on the Galapagos island of Española, a finding described as "a true story of success and hope in conservation" by the lead author of a study published today (Oct. 28).

Glioma is a common name for serious brain tumours. Different types of glioma are usually diagnosed as separate diseases and have been considered to arise from different cell types in the brain. Now researchers at Uppsala University, together with American colleagues, have shown that one and the same cell of origin can give rise to different types of glioma. This is important for the basic understanding of how these tumours are formed and can contribute to the development of more efficient and specific glioma therapies. The results have been published in Journal of Neuroscience.

Making mistakes while learning can benefit memory and lead to the correct answer, but only if the guesses are close-but-no-cigar, according to new research findings from Baycrest Health Sciences.

In the on-going effort to develop advanced biofuels as a clean, green and sustainable source of liquid transportation fuels, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Joint BioEnergy Institute (JBEI) have identified microbial genes that can improve both the tolerance and the production of biogasoline in engineered strains of Escherichia coli.

 

New Scientist - Online news

We're beginning to understand how digital devices affect literacy – but don't assume that paper is always better than screens






When bird pairs break up females often lay more eggs with a new partner, but the split can be disastrous for the male of the species






A tiny tube with a blade at the end can enter your heart via your neck to fix defects without having to cut open your whole chest






A forest of mysterious radiation arcs seen across our view of the universe might be down to a supernova-powered bubble expanding towards our sun






Sheets of gold one nanoparticle thick have been folded into tiny origami. Dubbed plasmene, the material has some of the weirdest optical properties around






Digital technology is transforming the way we read and write. Is it changing our minds too – and if so, for better or worse? (full text available to subscribers)






It is surprisingly difficult to build computers that can recognise the many different objects we see every day, but they are getting better all the time






As you read this, your neurons are firing – that brain activity can now be decoded to reveal the silent words in your head






All the latest on newscientist.com: the great sea otter comeback, cold moon with a warm heart, milk and broken bones, tribal lessons, overpopulation and more






Time-lapse imagery of scavengers tucking in proves that dead jellyfish aren't unpalatable after all, so can return nutrients to the sea's food webs






 
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