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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Tides and spin gave the Moon its strange lemon shape more than four billion years ago, research reveals.
A deep-sea octopus has been observed nursing her eggs for more than four years - the longest brooding time seen in any animal.
US engineers have developed a prototype tablet display that compensates for an individuals' vision problems.
Micro-drones are just starting to catch up with the hovering and flight performance of the tiny hummingbird, say scientists.
Scientists have separated a particle from one of its physical properties - proving a theory known as the "quantum Cheshire Cat".
UK scientists model the physical attributes that underpin our social judgements about strangers.
The Milky Way is lighter than previously thought and is only about half the mass of a neighbouring galaxy, researchers conclude.
Despite dissent, MPs have endorsed the findings of a UN climate panel that says humans are the dominant cause of global warming.
Birds' eggs show adaptations in pigment concentration and thickness to allow the right amount of sun for embryos, scientists say.
Fears recede over the fate of a Russian space satellite carrying gecko lizards as part of a sex experiment, after ground control restores contact.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Astronomers have found wildly misaligned planet-forming gas discs around the two young stars in the binary system HK Tauri. These new observations provide the clearest picture ever of protoplanetary discs in a double star. The new result also helps to explain why so many exoplanets — unlike the planets in the Solar System — came to have strange, eccentric or inclined orbits.
A study of dominance in female baboons suggests that the route to a higher rank is to maintain close ties with mom, and to have lots of supportive sisters.
Companies who make their money in the 'sin' industries such as the tobacco, alcohol and gaming industries typically receive less attention from institutional investors and financial analysts. But new research shows social norms and attitudes towards these types of businesses are subject to compromise when their share price looks to be on the rise.
Exotic pests, shrinking ranges and a changing climate threaten some of the world's most rare and ecologically important plants, and so conservationists establish seed collections to save the seeds in banks or botanical gardens in hopes of preserving some genetic diversity. For decades, these seed collections have been guided by simple models that offer a one-size-fits-all approach for how many seeds to gather. A new study, however, has found that more careful tailoring of seed collections to specific species and situations is critical to preserving plant diversity.
Researchers have, for the first time, conducted a study under real conditions on the body clocks of members of an international polar research station. The researchers have shown that a particular kind of artificial light is capable of ensuring that their biological rhythms are correctly synchronized despite the absence of sunlight.
 

Biology News Net

Printing whole new organs for transplants sounds like something out of a sci-fi movie, but the real-life budding technology could one day make actual kidneys, livers, hearts and other organs for patients who desperately need them. In the ACS journal Langmuir, scientists are reporting new understanding about the dynamics of 3-D bioprinting that takes them a step closer to realizing their goal of making working tissues and organs on-demand.


Sir David Attenborough narrates and appears in a video about the digital curation of a 20-million-year-old amber collection at the Illinois Natural History Survey at Illinois.
Scientists are searching through a massive collection of 20-million-year-old amber found in the Dominican Republic more than 50 years ago, and the effort is yielding fresh insights into ancient tropical insects and the world they inhabited.


Benjamin Hause has joined the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory as a research assistant professor. Hause uses next-generation sequencing and other new methods to rapidly identify pathogens.
He calls himself the bug hunter, but the target of his work consists of viruses that can only be found and identified with special methods and instruments. Benjamin Hause, an assistant research professor at the Kansas State Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory at Kansas State University, recently published an article about one of his discoveries, porcine enterovirus G, which is an important find in the United States.

Fifteen years ago, MIT professor John Essigmann and colleagues from the University of Washington had a novel idea for an HIV drug. They thought if they could induce the virus to mutate uncontrollably, they could force it to weaken and eventually die out — a strategy that our immune system uses against many viruses.


Wild tomato species are not edible, but they can be bred with domestic tomatoes to introduce new traits such as flavor and drought resistance. A new genome sequence for wild...
The genome of Solanum pennellii, a wild relative of the domestic tomato, has been published by an international group of researchers including the labs headed by Professors Neelima Sinha and Julin Maloof at the UC Davis Department of Plant Biology. The new genome information may help breeders produce tastier, more stress-tolerant tomatoes.

 

New Scientist - Online news

After decades of health warnings, the idea that steak, cheese and lard are bad for your heart is melting away. The truth is more complex – and delicious (full text available to subscribers)






The world's largest amphipod has been caught on film for the first time – and even if you love shrimp, this critter may give you nightmares






Business secretary Vince Cable announced today that the law is to be changed to allow self-piloting cars, like Google's, on Britain's roads by January 2015






The moon has odd lemon-like bulges on each side. A new model shows they were caused by the pull of Earth's gravity when the moon was young






A thought experiment has exposed a new kind of quantum link that could connect every particle in the universe, all the time






All the latest on newscientist.com: fracking in national parks, a search for genetic superheroes, rogue wave disasters, killer sperm and more






Iron supplements can play havoc with your gut. A small trial suggests that making the supplement out of nanoparticles relieves this problem






To catch piracatinga, fishermen cut up river dolphins for lures. Now the government has banned the fishery, turning to genetics to enforce the law






A novel computer model can predict how we will judge a person's character based on their looks. The work could help make avatars more human-like
The sperm of one nematode species harms the females of other species, perhaps explaining why the species remain distinct






 
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