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Science/biology news
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Science / biology news

Here you can see latest RSS-feeds from BBC News, New Scientist, ScienceDaily and Biology News Net.
If you don´t know the first thing about RSS (Rich Site Summary or Really Simple Syndication ) check this article.

 

BBC News - Science & Environment

Neuroscientists discover that primate brains show consistent differences according social status
A thriving economy can lead to the extinction of some languages, scientists believe.
Cockatoos learn to make and use tools when shown by another bird, research reveals.
African farmers face 'failed seasons' risk as a result of being overwhelmed by climate change, warns a status report on the continent's agriculture.
An engraving found at a cave in Gibraltar may be the most compelling evidence yet for Neanderthal art.
A global military intervention is needed to curb the largest ever Ebola outbreak, according to the medical charity Medecins Sans Frontieres.
Corals stir up the water, creating vortices that draw in nutrients and drive away waste, research reveals.
Don't get suckered, Mr Vacuum Cleaner tells people trying to beat new EU rules.
African ministers and business leaders gather in Ethiopia to consider ways to trigger a green revolution and improve the continent's food security.
Doping experts have yet to find an effective test to uncover athletes using the gases xenon and argon to boost performance, as a ban is introduced.
 

Latest Science News -- ScienceDaily

Cyberbullying was associated with mental health and substance use problems in adolescents, a new study shows, but family dinners may help protect teens from the consequences of cyberbullying and also be beneficial for their mental health.
The quality of the US diet showed some modest improvement in the last decade in large measure because of a reduction in the consumption of unhealthy trans fats, but the gap in overall diet quality widened between the rich and the poor.
Television shows filled with action and sound may be bad for your waistline. TV viewers ate more M&Ms, cookies, carrots and grapes while watching an excerpt from a Hollywood action film than those watching an interview program.
Conventional wisdom has long held that corals -- whose calcium-carbonate skeletons form the foundation of coral reefs -- are passive organisms that rely entirely on ocean currents to deliver dissolved substances, such as nutrients and oxygen. But now scientists have found that they are far from passive, engineering their environment to sweep water into turbulent patterns that greatly enhance their ability to exchange nutrients and dissolved gases with their environment.
Female magpies have been shown to be more adventurous than their male siblings, according to new research. “The fact that observable differences between the first hatched and last hatched magpie’s behaviors exist indicates that mothers may be able to produce variable traits, possibly through adjustable transmission of maternal hormones or creating the conditions for sibling rivalry. Mothers could potentially produce a variety of personalities perhaps as an adaptive strategy in unpredictable environmental conditions," researchers say.
 

Biology News Net

About 50 years ago, electron microscopy revealed the presence of tiny blob-like structures that form inside cells, move around and disappear. But scientists still don't know what they do — even though these shifting cloud-like collections of proteins are believed to be crucial to the life of a cell, and therefore could offer a new approach to disease treatment.

When we learn, we associate a sensory experience either with other stimuli or with a certain type of behaviour. The neurons in the cerebral cortex that transmit the information modify the synaptic connections that they have with the other neurons. According to a generally-accepted model of synaptic plasticity, a neuron that communicates with others of the same kind emits an electrical impulse as well as activating its synapses transiently. This electrical pulse, combined with the signal received from other neurons, acts to stimulate the synapses. How is it that some neurons are caught up in the communication interplay even when they are barely connected? This is the crucial chicken-or-egg puzzle of synaptic plasticity that a team led by Anthony Holtmaat, professor in the Department of Basic Neurosciences in the Faculty of Medicine at UNIGE, is aiming to solve. The results of their research into memory in silent neurons can be found in the latest edition of Nature.


The soil bacteria Streptomyces form filamentous branches that extend into the air to create spiraling towers of spores.
Scientists have identified the developmental on-off switch for Streptomyces, a group of soil microbes that produce more than two-thirds of the world's naturally derived antibiotic medicines.

A candidate Ebola vaccine could be given to healthy volunteers in the UK, The Gambia and Mali as early as September, as part of an series of safety trials of potential vaccines aimed at preventing the disease that has killed more than 1,400 people in the current outbreak in West Africa.

In response to an ongoing, unprecedented outbreak of Ebola virus disease (EVD) in West Africa, a team of researchers from the Broad Institute and Harvard University, in collaboration with the Sierra Leone Ministry of Health and Sanitation and researchers across institutions and continents, has rapidly sequenced and analyzed more than 99 Ebola virus genomes. Their findings could have important implications for rapid field diagnostic tests. The team reports its results online in the journal Science.

 

New Scientist - Online news

After a lone Goffin cockatoo figured out how to make and use a simple tool, others have learned the same trick by watching him






Hubristic humans should heed the tale of the passenger pigeon's demise, recounted by three books published on the centenary of its extinction






The scream of a Formula 1 engine, the growl of a luxury saloon: both evoke visceral reactions. Can electric cars do the same? (full text available to subscribers)






Humans innovate to dodge disaster, and we are pretty good at it, according to The Big Ratchet by Ruth DeFries – but can we do it indefinitely?






If kids regularly miss out on eating breakfast, they may be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, just as adults are






All the latest on newscientist.com: how Jennifer Lawrence leaked from the cloud, proton therapy, idyllic conservation, extreme Ebola measures and more






The dumping of millions of tonnes of sediment in the Great Barrier Marine Park looks set to be scrapped, but the sediment still has to go somewhere






A series of huge numbers have been broken into their prime-number building blocks faster than ever before, with implications for online cryptography






Modern technology appears to have saved a Soviet relic, following a smartphone vote on the fate of Moscow's extraordinary Shukhov Tower






With the Ebola outbreak in West Africa doubling by the month, the World Health Organization is pushing more extreme measures to contain the virus






 
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